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USCIS Averts Furlough of Nearly 70% of Workforce

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Drastic cuts will impact agency operations for foreseeable future WASHINGTON—U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services today announced that the agency will avert an administrative furlough of more than 13,000 employees, scheduled to begin Aug. 30 as a result of unprecedented spending cuts and a steady increase in daily incoming revenue and receipts. USCIS expects to be,

Drastic cuts will impact agency operations for foreseeable future

WASHINGTON—U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services today announced that the agency will avert an administrative furlough of more than 13,000 employees, scheduled to begin Aug. 30 as a result of unprecedented spending cuts and a steady increase in daily incoming revenue and receipts.

USCIS expects to be able to maintain operations through the end of fiscal year 2020. Aggressive spending reduction measures will impact all agency operations, including naturalizations, and will drastically impact agency contracts.

“Our workforce is the backbone of every USCIS accomplishment. Their resilience and strength of character always serves the nation well, but in this year of uncertainty, they remain steadfast in their mission administering our nation’s lawful immigration system, safeguarding its integrity and protecting the American people, even as a furlough loomed before them,” said USCIS Deputy Director for Policy Joseph Edlow. “However, averting this furlough comes at a severe operational cost that will increase backlogs and wait times across the board, with no guarantee we can avoid future furloughs. A return to normal operating procedures requires congressional intervention to sustain the agency through fiscal year 2021.”

The additional cost savings come through the descoping of federal contracts that assist USCIS adjudicators in processing and preparing case files as well as a myriad of other support activities. Anticipated operational impacts include increased wait times for pending case inquiries with the USCIS Contact Center, longer case processing times, and increased adjudication time for aliens adjusting status or naturalizing. Naturalization ceremonies will continue. Previously, members of Congress requested that agency leadership avoid operational cuts of this magnitude. However, Congress must still act on a long-term solution that will provide USCIS with the necessary financial assistance to sustain the agency throughout FY 2021 and beyond.

For more information on USCIS and its programs, please visit uscis.gov or follow us on Twitter (@USCIS), Instagram (/USCIS), YouTube (/uscis), Facebook (/uscis), and LinkedIn (/uscis).

Source: USCIS Averts Furlough of Nearly 70% of Workforce

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BREAKING

The EB-5 Immigrant Investor Program Is Suspended. What Happens Now?

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According to this article on Entrepreneur, by Shai Zamanian

“June 30, 2021 marked the sunset date for the United States EB-5 Immigrant Investor Program. This means that as of 1 July 2021, the United States Citizenship and Immigration Services are no longer accepting petitions submitted under the EB-5 Regional Center category. For the program to continue to operate and accept petitions it needs to be reauthorized by Congress and at this current time, Congress has not reauthorized the program. Therefore it is important to unpack what this means for the future of the program and its current investors.”

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BREAKING

What you need to know about latest DACA court decision

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According to this article on NEW YORK DAILY NEWS, by ALLAN WERNICK

“In a disappointing decision this week, U.S. District Court Judge Andrew Hanen of Texas ordered U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services to stop approving new Deferred Action for Childhood Arrival (DACA) applications.

DACA is the program begun by President Obama that prevents deportations of some immigrants brought to the United States as children. The court order only applies to new DACA requests not approved by July 16.”

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USCIS and Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) updates

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According to this article on News India Times, by Dev B. Viswanath, Esq.

“On July 16, 2021, the U.S. District Court for the Southern District of Texas held that the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) policy “is illegal.” The Court: 1) granted summary judgment on plaintiffs’ Administrative Procedure Act (APA) claims; 2) vacated the June 15, 2012 DACA memorandum issued by former Secretary of Homeland Security Napolitano; 3) remanded the memorandum to DHS for further consideration; and 4) issued a permanent injunction prohibiting the government’s continued administration of DACA and the reimplementation of DACA without compliance with the APA. However, the Court, also, temporarily stayed its order vacating the DACA memorandum and its injunction with regard to individuals who obtained DACA on or before July 16, 2021, including those with renewal requests. This means that people that currently have DACA or people who are renewing their DACA approvals, may continue to file the same but there are additional implications.”

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